Admission Standards

Technical Standards for Admission as a professional student

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees must be able to perform the essential functions in each of the following categories: observation, communication, motor, intellectual, and behavioral/social. However, it is recognized that degrees of ability vary among individuals.

If a potential applicant feels unable to meet these technical standards he/she is encouraged prior to application to discuss your disability with the executive director of Equal Opportunity and Regulatory Compliance at The University of Mississippi to determine whether or not reasonable accommodations can be made.

The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy is committed to enabling its students by any reasonable means or accommodations to complete the course of study leading to the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees.

1. Observation

All candidates must be able to:

  • Observe lectures, demonstrations, experiments, and practice-based activities.
  • Observe physiological and pharmacological demonstrations, evaluation of microbiological cultures, and microscopic studies of organisms and tissues in normal and pathological states.
  • Observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand.
  • Read information on a computer screen.
  • Remain fully alert and attentive at all times in clinical settings.

Additionally, candidates for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree must be able to evaluate visible patient signs and symptoms for the purposes of monitoring drug therapy.

2. Communication

All candidates must be able to:

  • Communicate effectively, sensitively, and rapidly with patients, caregivers, and members of the health care team.
  • Speak, listen, read, and write in the English language.
  • Effectively communicate with instructors and peers.

Additionally, candidates for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree must be able to:

  • Communicate with health care practitioners specifically in reviewing and recommending verbal and written drug therapy orders.
  • Elicit information from patients, describe changes in mood, activity and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications.

3. Psychomotor Skills

All candidates must be able to:

  • Have sufficient motor function to execute all aspects of processing multiple types of drug orders and compounding of medications.
  • Engage in safe and aseptic handling of sterile preparations.
  • Safely and effectively operate appropriate equipment (e.g., microscope, typewriter, glucose monitors, peak flow meters).

Additionally, candidates for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree must be able to:

  • engage in basic physical assessment activities including palpation, auscultation, percussion, and other diagnostic maneuvers.

4. Intellect

All candidates must be able to:

  • Comprehend three-dimensional relationships and understand the spatial relationships of structures.
  • Solve problems involving measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation rapidly in a multi-task setting.
  • Synthesize knowledge and integrate the relevant aspects of a patient’s history, physical findings, and monitoring studies.

Additionally, candidates for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree must be able to:

  • use information to develop a drug therapy and monitoring plan in a reasonable amount of time.

5. Behavioral and Social Attributes

All candidates must be able to:

  • Possess the emotional health required for full use of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt and safe completion of all responsibilities.
  • Adapt to change, to display flexibility and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties and stressful situations.
  • Possess compassion, integrity, interpersonal skills, motivation, empathy, and concern for others.
  • Demonstrate ethical behavior.
  • Function effectively in situations of physical and emotional stress.
  • Accept appropriate suggestions and criticism and, if necessary, respond by modification.

Additionally, candidates for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree must be able to:

  • Exercise good judgment and prompt completion of all responsibilities involved in the pharmaceutical care of patients.
  • Have the capacity to develop mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients.

Admission into this degree program occurs in the spring semester of the high school senior year, i.e., “Early Entry,” but more typically after completion of the Pre-pharmacy curriculum at The University of Mississippi or other accredited institution, i.e., “Regular Entry.”